Ransomware: Are You Protected?


Posted on May 15th in Education, HIPAA Information, News, Uncategorized

ransomewareOn May 12, 2017 The Department for Homeland Security released the following report:

US-CERT has received multiple reports of WannaCry ransomware infections in several countries around the world. Ransomware is a type of malicious software that infects a computer and restricts users’ access to it until a ransom is paid to unlock it. Individuals and organizations are discouraged from paying the ransom, as this does not guarantee access will be restored.

Can HIPAA compliance help covered entities and business associates prevent infections of malware, including ransomware?

Yes. The HIPAA Security Rule requires implementation of security measures that can help prevent the introduction of malware, including ransomware. Some of the required security measures include:

• implementing a security management process, which includes conducting a risk analysis to identify threats and vulnerabilities to electronic protected health information (ePHI) and implementing security measures to mitigate or remediate those identified risks;
• implementing procedures to guard against and detect malicious software;
•training users on malicious software protection so they can assist in detecting malicious software and know how to report such detections; and
• implementing access controls to limit access to ePHI to only those persons or software programs requiring access.

Is it a HIPAA breach if ransomware infects a covered entity’s or business associate’s computer system?

Whether or not the presence of ransomware would be a breach under the HIPAA Rules is a fact-specific determination. A breach under the HIPAA Rules is defined as, “…the acquisition, access, use, or disclosure of PHI in a manner not permitted under the [HIPAA Privacy Rule] which compromises the security or privacy of the PHI.” See 45 C.F.R. 164.402

When electronic protected health information (ePHI) is encrypted as the result of a ransomware attack, a breach has occurred because the ePHI encrypted by the ransomware was acquired (i.e., unauthorized individuals have taken possession or control of the information), and thus is a “disclosure” not permitted under the HIPAA Privacy Rule.

Unless the covered entity or business associate can demonstrate that there is a “…low probability that the PHI has been compromised,” based on the factors set forth in the Breach Notification Rule, a breach of PHI is presumed to have occurred. The entity must then comply with the applicable breach notification provisions, including notification to affected individuals without unreasonable delay, to the Secretary of HHS, and to the media (for breaches affecting over 500 individuals) in accordance with HIPAA breach notification requirements. See 45 C.F.R. 164.400-414.

Call the Kentucky REC today at 859-323-3090 to see how we can help with your HIPAA compliance.

Sources:
https://www.us-cert.gov/ncas/current-activity/2017/05/12/Multiple-Ransomware-Infections-Reported

https://www.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/RansomwareFactSheet.pdf